What is asphalt shingle recycling?
It is becoming increasingly common for shingles to be recycled instead of going to a landfill.
Shingle recycling is the process of taking asphalt shingles from roof tear-offs and reusing them
in other products, ensuring the material does not end up in landfill.
What are the benefits of asphalt shingle recycling?
Shingle recycling is economically viable, convenient where available, and saves valuable
resources from being sent to a landfill. Recycled asphalt shingles have most commonly been
used in pavement, which offsets the need for new asphalt and aggregate, and additional uses
are being explored. Some manufacturers have developed or are developing processes to
produce asphalt roofing shingles containing recycled materials from post-consumer and postmanufacture waste shingles, thereby creating a potential circular economy for asphalt roofing
shingles. Asphalt shingle recycling can create jobs for recycling locations, reduce costs for
paving, and allow homeowners to make a positive environmental contribution.
In what products are recycled asphalt shingles used?
The primary use of recycled shingles is to make roads, typically by adding pulverized shingles to
the other asphalt used in pavement. In many cases, this may actually improve the pavement
quality. Recycled shingles can also be used as an input to make roofing products or road
maintenance products, or to produce energy.
How many asphalt shingles are recycled in roads?
One of the best estimates of asphalt shingle recycling into roads is developed by the National
Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA), whose annual survey of asphalt mixture producers and
state asphalt pavement associations estimates the use of reclaimed asphalt shingles (RAS) into
asphalt pavement. Using information from the 2020 NAPA survey,1 ARMA estimates an
equivalent of approximately 234,000 residential roofs were recycled into asphalt pavement.2
What other options are available for recycling asphalt roofing besides using asphalt shingles
in pavement?
In addition to use in pavement, asphalt roofing products can be used as:
• an ingredient in cold patch formulations used for pothole repair,
• an additive in manufacture of new asphalt shingles, underlayments, and roll roofing
products,
• aggregate for the base layer in road construction,

• a component in the production of roof pavers,
• a dust and erosion control agent for rural roads and construction sites,
• and a fuel supplement in incinerators for energy generation.
Which states allow recycled asphalt shingles (RAS) into their pavement? Where is this
practice most prevalent?
The National Asphalt Pavement Association (NAPA) annual survey of asphalt mixture producers
and state asphalt pavement associations provides information about recycled asphalt shingle
use in each state. In their 2020 survey,1 RAS usage was reported in twenty-four states. RAS
usage has been reported every year from 2010 through 2020 in each of the following states:
California, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, North Carolina,
Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Washington. In the 2020 survey, the top ten
states with highest estimated RAS usage are Texas, North Carolina, Massachusetts, Illinois,
Wisconsin, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Minnesota, Kentucky, and Arkansas.
How can I find an asphalt shingle recycler nearby?
Shingle recycling is available in most major markets in the United States and in some locations
in Canada, and new sites continue to open. There are multiple resources for finding a recycler,
including online at www.shinglerecycling.org and www.earth911.com, or by calling 1-800-
CLEANUP. You can also use local resources for finding businesses or conduct an internet search.
No matter which method is used to find a recycler, contact them directly to confirm their
current capability to accept and process shingles for recycling.
Is every asphalt shingle recycler listed on ShingleRecycling.org or Earth911.com?
No! If you know of a location that is not listed, please let ShingleRecycling.org or Earth911.com
know by emailing info@shinglerecycling.org or info@earth911.com.
What if I can’t find an asphalt shingle recycler nearby?
Send an email to info@shinglerecycling.org or visit Earth911 Recycling Search.
Do roofing contractors or do-it-yourselfers have to separate material as it is removed from
the roof?
Call ahead to your recycler to determine what your recycler allows. Each recycler has specific
rules regarding requirements for separating shingles from other materials. It is good practice to
keep shingles separate from other construction debris, such as wood or metal or other
disposed materials.
What about nails?
You do not have to pull out nails — most recyclers use powerful magnets on the shingle grinder to separate nails from shingles and then recycle the nails as well. Confirm with your local
recycler on its capabilities and requirements for accepting shingles for recycling.
How much does recycling cost?
Recycling costs vary. It is typically cheaper than landfilling and might even become less
expensive if materials are separated properly.
I do not want a large roll-off container in my yard. Will recyclers work with dump trailers?
Many recyclers are flexible, and options can be determined by calling to ask.
Should I bring up recycling with my contractor?
Many roofing contractors will market their past success in recycling shingles. Regardless, any
roofing contractor should be open to the conversation and should confirm the ability and
logistics for recycling the shingles involved in your project
1
Williams, Brett A., J. Richard Willis, and Joseph Shacat (National Asphalt Pavement Association,
Greenbelt, MD), “Asphalt Pavement Industry Survey on Recycled Materials and Warm-Mix Asphalt
Usage: 2020,” December 2021.
2
Estimate is based on assumption the shingles disposed during a typical single-layer roof replacement
project weigh 2.5 pounds per square foot of roof area, and the average size of a typical roof is 2000
square feet.

Self-adhesive (SA) modified bituminous membranes provide an effective finished roof when properly
installed. These systems combine the long-term, proven performance of modified bitumen sheet
materials with installation advantages imparted by a self-adhesive bituminous layer.
Product Description, Manufacturing Process and Governing Standards
Self-adhesive modified bituminous membranes are comprised of asphalt, polymers, and tackifiers, and
may contain mineral stabilizers. The products may be reinforced with fiberglass, polyester, or a
combination of the two. Products designed for exposure to the elements are typically surfaced with
mineral granules, coatings, films, or other opaque surfacing. The self-adhesive layer is protected with a
release film or paper, which is removed during installation.
Labor saving application without the added complications of torching, mopping, or liquid adhesives is
one of the primary advantages of self-adhesive membranes. Because there are no kettles or torches
required, installation of self-adhesive membranes may be less disruptive to building occupants.
Many self–adhesive modified bituminous membranes are evaluated using test methods in ASTM
D5147, as are other modified bituminous sheet materials, and may meet the physical properties of
asphalt base sheets or modified bitumen sheet material standards such as ASTM D4601, ASTM D1970,
ASTM D6162, ASTM D6163, ASTM D6164, and CSA A123.23.
Product Storage Prior to Use
Self-adhesive modified bituminous membranes are generally packaged and stored in cardboard boxes or
they are protected with opaque wrapping. Unprotected self-adhesive products should not be stored in
direct sunlight since exposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays may affect the adhesive properties, especially on
the outer convolutions of the roll, or cause “dog-legging” of the roll. Storage for extended periods or
under extreme conditions can alter the adhesion properties of the self-adhesive bitumen or affect roll
alignment.
Installation
The following items should be considered when installing a self-adhesive membrane system.
 Always consult manufacturer’s application recommendations before specifying or installing a
particular product.
 At the time of installation, the air, product, and substrate temperatures should be at or above
the minimum application temperature recommended by the manufacturer. While the typical
minimum temperature range for application is 40-50°F, consult the specific manufacturer for
recommendations for material storage and handling during colder weather application. Selfadhesive products should only be applied to an acceptable substrate, as specified by the
product manufacturer. The substrate must be free of dust, dirt, oils, moisture or debris that
could interfere with proper adhesion.
 Manufacturers may require the substrate be primed prior to membrane application to aid
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adhesion of self- adhesive membranes. Primers are applied by brush, roller, or spray. Check
with the manufacturer to determine requirements for primer type, application rate, and drying
time. Solvent-based primers may damage the self-adhered membrane and roof system if the
solvent had not evaporated fully before the installation of the roof system.
 Unlike other installation methods for modified bitumen membranes, there is no liquid
bituminous layer to fill all the surface irregularities. Consequently, proper application is
essential, especially at all overlaps and T- joints. Applying pressure to the sheet with a heavy
roller is typically required. End laps on mineral-surfaced self-adhesive sheets may need to be
heat welded or sealed with compatible roofing mastics as specified by the manufacturer. If
using solvent-based mastic, following manufacturer recommended application rates and other
precautions to prevent solvent-induced damage to the membrane.
Where different grades of self-adhesive products and/or primers are available for cold weather
application refer to the manufacturer’s written instructions for guidance on proper product selection.
For more information, please consult the ARMA Modified Bitumen Design Guide for Building Owners.
The Design Guide addresses relevant aspects, issues and concerns of modified bituminous roofing
systems and their associated components, substrates, construction techniques and innovative uses.

Introduction
Roof membrane systems are intended to provide protection from natural elements, such as rain, snow,
hail, and sleet. Systems that are properly designed, installed, and maintained should provide the user
with long-term satisfactory protection from these elements. Some roof membrane systems, such as
those installed on certain factories, restaurants, and other buildings with a high probability for unusual
levels of contamination, require special care in design. The presence of greases, oils, bacteria, and/or
other agents on the roof surface that may adversely affect the integrity of the roof membrane should be
taken into consideration. The specifier should select the type of roof membrane system that will best
satisfy the performance requirements based upon the number, type, and expected quantity of
contaminants present. This document is intended to aid the specifier by highlighting the effects that
various contaminants, if not considered in the design phase, may have on polymer modified bitumen
membranes.
Effects of Oils and Greases
Modified bitumen roof membranes may be adversely affected by exposure to cooking oils (animal or
vegetable) and greases. Unprotected membrane may experience degradation around exhaust vents,
where the roof membrane has repeated contact with these contaminants. The organic substances
contained within oils and greases may weaken and eventually break down the polymer-bitumen
network, causing premature failure of the roof.
Petroleum-derived products, such as greases that leak from rooftop equipment, or hydrocarbons such
as gasoline, paint thinners and kerosene spilled during maintenance operations, may likewise cause
degradation of the roof. Due to the relatively fast evaporation rate of many hydrocarbon materials, any
detrimental effects caused by a one-time contamination may be shorter term and less severe in nature
than those caused by greases or recurring spills. Always report such contamination incidents to the
membrane manufacturer for guidance.
Effects of Bacteria and Fungi
Factories producing foods such as potato pulp and dry milk have reported cases of modified bitumen
membrane deterioration due to bacteria and/or other causes. These conditions may result in “mud
cracking,” which may ultimately lead to damage of the modified bitumen membrane. Excessive bird
droppings may also cause degradation of the roof membrane due to a combination of solids build-up
and subsequent “mud cracking,” bacteria, and the acidity of the droppings. The degree of degradation is
dependent upon the type of microorganism, temperature and other conditions. While certain roof
coatings can alleviate the effects of surface contaminants, the type and quality best suited for the
specific rooftop conditions, should be addressed with the membrane manufacturer.
Fungus growth, which typically occurs in hot, humid regions, does not cause the same detrimental
effects as “mud cracking” and bacterial attack and usually poses only aesthetic concerns.
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Effects of Other Chemicals
Other chemicals, such as solvents, acids, bases and oxidizing agents, may cause varying degrees of harm
to polymer-modified bitumen roof membranes, such as swelling, softening (reducing resistance to foot
traffic), and slumping of the bitumen compound of the membrane. Many modified bitumen sheet
materials may be applied using solvent-based cold process adhesives, and care should be taken to
ensure that the adhesive is approved for use by the membrane manufacturer and that the application
guidelines for adhesive quantity and flash-off (curing) are followed. Contact the roof membrane
manufacturer to obtain additional information regarding the effects of adhesives, chemicals, and
contaminants on modified bitumen sheet materials.
Recommendations
 Wherever possible, reduce or eliminate exposure of roofing components to contaminants.
 Determine the types and concentrations of contaminants that may be present on the roof. When
re-roofing, investigate what effects, if any, contaminants have had on the existing roof before
specifying and applying a new roofing system.
 Use commercially available traps and/or filters designed to capture contaminants exhausted from
rooftop equipment.
 Establish a roof maintenance program to monitor affected roof sections and to properly maintain
traps or filters.
 Provide positive drainage (at least 1/4” per foot roof slope) to prevent ponding in the affected
area.
 If contaminant effects are minor, increase the number of plies and/or add resistant coatings to
provide adequate protection.
 Consider the use of properly specified roof coatings on roof areas where the roof membrane will
be exposed to contaminants.
 Investigate alternate venting designs that minimize or eliminate contamination of the roofing
membrane.

Introduction
The application of any roofing system during cold weather poses special challenges. Specific to modified
bitumen materials, these challenges can include maintaining proper sheet material, adhesive, and
asphalt temperatures at the point of application. Cold temperatures may stiffen sheet materials, reduce
the curing or flash-off rate of adhesives, diminish the effective bonding of self-adhesive materials, and
cause mopping asphalts to cool prematurely. By following proper procedures and exercising
recommended precautions, cold weather application can progress more efficiently and effectively,
yielding a high quality result.
Protect Materials Prior to Application
Protecting all roofing materials from the weather is important regardless of conditions, but extra
precaution should be exercised in cold weather. Storage of roofing materials without adequate
protection may affect the quality of the materials, and could also result in moisture being incorporated
into the roof system. Therefore, it is essential to use proper techniques when storing and handling
these roofing materials.
Modified bitumen roll goods, base sheets, and other materials become less flexible at lower
temperatures. When roof systems are installed at ambient temperatures below 50°F (10°C), for best
results it is recommended that all materials should be stored in a dry, heated area for a minimum of 24
hours prior to installation. This allows the modified bitumen to remain flexible during roll out.
All adhesives and primers should be stored in accordance with the manufacturer’s guidelines until just
prior to use. Water-based cements and/or coating materials must be protected to prevent freezing.
Remove moisture, dirt, snow, and ice from roofing asphalts before they are heated; failure to do so can
lead to dangerous frothing inside hot kettles.
Plan Carefully
Acceptable weather conditions are based not only on the actual ambient temperature, but also the total
combination of nature’s elements (e.g. wind, humidity, dew point temperature, sun, cloud cover, shade,
snow, sleet, etc.). Careful planning of work during cold weather can greatly improve the quality of the
installation. Laying out the roof area and placing materials where they will be needed just prior to
application will minimize problems associated with cold weather application.
Surface Preparation
As with any climatic condition, all surfaces to which any roofing materials will be applied must be dry,
smooth, and free of dirt and loose material.
Application Recommendations
For all cold weather applications, follow the manufacturer’s installation instructions as they pertain to
2
cold weather application and temperature limitations. Never throw or drop rolls of material. Should
wrinkling of roll goods occur during installation, unroll and cut the material, typically in lengths of halves
or thirds, and allow the cut pieces to relax before application. The time needed to relax may vary
depending on the ambient conditions, product type, and/or material thickness.
Use the Right Materials
If different grades of materials are available for cold weather application, refer to the manufacturer’s
written instructions for guidance on proper product selection.
Complete Each Roof Section Daily as Specified
As the work progresses day-to-day, it is essential that each section of the roof be completed as
specified. Application should be scheduled as specified so that there are no partially completed sections
of the roof left exposed overnight. Additionally, “water cutoffs” should be provided at exposed edges at
the close of each day. Water cutoffs should be removed prior to resuming construction of the roof
assembly.
Torch Application
During membrane application, follow the manufacturer’s recommended torching practice, and industry
torch application safety guidelines (e.g., Certified Roofing Torch Applicator – CERTA). Proper heating
technique is required for proper adhesion of the membrane. The end and side lap areas should be given
special attention, as these are the primary waterproofing junctures of the membrane.
Cold Adhesives
Cold adhesives may be utilized when installing modified bitumen systems in cold weather. Such
adhesives can be utilized for all layers of modified bitumen roof membrane construction. They may
contain asphalt modifiers and can be applied by squeegee, roller, brush, or spray equipment. All
adhesives should be stored at a minimum temperature of 50°F (10°C), and for better results not less
than 70°F (21°C). Follow the manufacturer’s instructions for storage, use, and application. Cold
adhesives become more viscous at lower temperatures, which may affect the application rates. If the
coverage rate exceeds the manufacturer’s installation instructions, reevaluate one of the following: the
application method, the storage of the product, or the condition of the product.
Self-Adhesive Products
At the time of installation, the air, product, and substrate temperatures should be at or above the
minimum application temperature specified by the manufacturer. While the typical minimum
temperature range for application is 40-50°F (4-10°C), consult the specific manufacturer for
recommendations for material storage and handling during colder weather application. Some
manufacturers offer different grades of self-adhesive products, or unique primers, based on their
minimum application temperature requirements.
Hot Asphalt Applied Products
At the point of contact with the modified bitumen sheet material, the mopping asphalt should be
applied at its equiviscous temperature (“EVT”) or a minimum of 400°F (204°C), whichever is higher, or
per manufacturer’s recommendations. A sufficiently high asphalt temperature is essential for adequate
adhesion of SBS modified membranes. It is important for the applicator to be aware that liquid asphalt
cools quickly once applied to a roofing substrate. Components of the roofing system must be installed
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swiftly and “close to the mop.” Be sure that all components are well embedded. Mop-leads (typically no
more than five feet in front of the roll) should not exceed the manufacturer’s instructions. Failure to use
proper application techniques has the potential to result in poor membrane adhesion and possible
system failure.
Proper insulation of all asphalt handling equipment is required to keep asphalt hot in cold weather.
Equipment insulation is also essential for fuel conservation and reducing make-ready time. Use of
insulated tank trucks and rooftop equipment for transporting asphalt, such as hot luggers and mop
buckets, is recommended. Asphalt lines from the kettle to the roof should also be insulated, particularly
when asphalt is being piped over long distances. Read more

The maximum slope considered by ARMA to be suitable for normal asphalt shingle application is 21:12, or 21” per foot. The use
of asphalt shingles on slopes greater than 21:12 (e.g., mansard roofs) requires the use of special application methods because
very steep slopes reduce the effectiveness of factory-applied self-sealing adhesives, especially in colder climates and shaded
areas. If normal application methods are used for asphalt shingles on very steep slopes, problems can occur that are not a result
of any weakness or defect in the product, but rather because special application methods for very steep slopes were not
employed.
If a roof slope exceeds 21:12, the shingles should be applied by the following recommended method:
 Secure the shingle to the roof deck with fasteners as directed by the roofing manufacturer. Manufacturer directions may
call for more than the normal number of fasteners per shingle and may provide specific fastener locations.
 Apply a manufacturer-recommended asphalt roof cement complying with ASTM D4586, Standard Specification for Asphalt
Roof Cement, Asbestos-Free, or other cements approved by the roofing manufacturer under all shingle tabs in spots
equivalent to the size of a quarter (about 1” diameter), immediately upon installation.
o For standard laminated shingles (i.e., ‘no cut-out’ shingles) apply four spots of cement under each shingle near the
lowermost edge, with two near the corners and two equally spaced between the corners.
o For ‘three-tab’ shingles, apply two spots of cement under each tab near the lowermost corners.
o For other specialty shingles, refer to manufacturer’s recommendations.
 Over-application of adhesives is not recommended; follow manufacturer’s recommendation for cement type and minimum
and maximum quantities.
 An unvented space may be behind a mansard roof. It is important to provide a properly ventilated flow-through air space
behind the roof sheathing to prevent the entrapment of moisture-laden air. Additional information is available on ARMA’s
website.

For many years, roof discoloration caused by algae has been observed throughout the United States and Canada. The
discoloration usually has a brown to black appearance, and may be mistaken for fungus growth, soot, dirt, moss, or tree
droppings.
Gloeocapsa magma is probably the most prevalent of several algae species that contribute to discoloration. All species are
transported through the air, and tend to collect and grow upon roofing structures. Natural pigments produced by these algae
may cause a white or light colored roof to gradually turn dark brown or black. Discoloration may appear as uniform
discolorations or streaks. The algae discolorations should not be confused with moss or tree droppings, which typically
produce only localized discolorations.
This type of roof discoloration has been most widespread in the Gulf States and along the Northwest and Eastern Seaboards.
It is not, however, confined exclusively to these regions. Algae growth occurs to varying degrees in all regions of the country,
especially those subjected to warm, humid conditions. It should be noted that almost all types of roofing systems are
susceptible to algae discoloration. It is, of course, most readily visible upon light colored roofs, while it is not so visible upon
darker shades of roofing.
Algae discolorations are difficult to remove from roofing surfaces, but may be lightened by applying a solution of liquid
household chlorine bleach (sodium hypochlorite) and water. Directions for mixing solutions of these ingredients may vary
among shingle manufacturers and depend on the amount of discoloration. A typical solution should be one part chlorine
bleach and one part water. Other cleaning chemicals or methods should not be used without approval of the shingle
manufacturer.
First, gently disperse this solution on the roofing surface. Use normal precautions for handling bleach including eye protection
and rubber gloves. Be sure to apply it carefully to avoid damage to other parts of the building and the surrounding landscape.
Avoid scrubbing the surface, as this friction may loosen and remove granules. If possible, always work from a ladder and/or
walkboards to avoid direct contact with the roof surface. Observe all possible safety precautions when working on or near the
roof. The solution should be left on the roof for at least 15 minutes but for no more than 20 minutes. Finally, rinse the solution
from the roof by gently spraying the surface with water. Be warned that this solution application and rinse process will make
the roof surface slippery and potentially hazardous to walk on during treatment.
The effectiveness of a cleaning technique is only temporary, and discoloration will likely reoccur. However, several types of
algae resistant roofing products have been developed and are now commercially available. These asphalt roofing products
are specifically designed to inhibit algae growth for extended periods of time.
Caution!
High pressure washing systems are likely to damage asphalt roofing and should not be used on asphalt roofing for removing
algae or for any other purpose.

Designed to stand the test of time, this all-masonry wall system pairs a concrete block structure with brick for a beautiful, durable, and maintenance-free façade.

Cavity Wall: Brick Veneer/Reinforced Concrete Block
Coping and bond beam Flashing at base of wall Wall ties and insulation Truss attachment to bulb 'T'

RECOMMENDED BUILDING TYPES

  • Schools, commercial and institutional buildings
  • Buildings requiring a high fire rating
  • Noisy environments
  • Areas with frequent rainfall
  • Buildings with a long expected life span. The concrete block structural backup will not burn, rot, rust, mold or be eaten by termites.
  • Buildings in climates with high humidity. Concrete block is not a food source for mold.
  • Choosing the Right Masonry System for your Budget

BENEFITS

  • Tough, beautiful brick exterior over a structural concrete block backup system
  • Extremely durable, long lasting wall system
  • Minimal long-term maintenance
  • Great design flexibility – use different colors, bond patterns, brick sizes, and surface textures to spice up your design
  • Concrete block backup acts as the structure, with vertical and horizontal reinforcement grouted into place
  • Cavity system inherently weatherproof – great for moist environments
  • Excellent insulating value and heat capacity
  • Fire proof with gs up to 4 hours
  • Great for noisy environments – naturally absorbs sound
  • One trade erects both the structural and skin layers of the wall

SPECIAL CONSIDERATIONS

  • Lower life cycle cost offsets higher initial investment
  • This substantial wall system may require larger foundation

DEFINITION AND ASSUMPTIONS

Backup: Lightweight plain gray concrete block (CMU), 8″ x 8″ x 16″ (nom.)

Reinforcement: #6 vertical reinforcement @ 32″ on center. 9-gaugejoint reinforcement/wall ties at 16″ o.c. (every other course)

Veneer: Modular clay brick 4″ x 2-1/3″ x 8″(nom.)

Cavity: 3″ air space

Insulation: 2″ rigid expanded polystyrene in drainage cavity

Flashing: Base flashing and weeps

Veneer ties: Adjustable pintle and eye veneer ties

Mortar: Type N, Portland cement/lime, plain gray

Joints: concave tooled

REGIONAL VARIATIONS

  • When masonry veneer is used in areas of high seismic risk, veneer ties are required to attach to the wire reinforcement embedded in mortar bed joints in the veneer. Check your local requirements – and save money by using normal veneer ties in areas of low seismic risk.
  • Many areas of the western U.S. have good local sources for lightweight aggregate, and the use of lightweight concrete block (CMU) is the norm. In other parts of the country, medium weight and normal weight block are more common.
  • Structural masonry walls in areas of high seismic risk are required to have additional horizontal bond beams to resist seismic loads. Check with your structural engineer to determine what is required in your region.
  • The use of reinforced bond beams can replace the necessity forjoint reinforcement in concrete masonry walls. Understand that some form of horizontal reinforcement is required in all concrete masonry construction, including veneer applications.

FIRE RATING (HOURS)

Ungrouted Assembly: 4 hrs

Fully grouted Assembly: 4 hrs

SOUND TRANSMISSION CLASS (DB)

Ungrouted: 55.5

Grouted 32″: 57.2

Fully grouted: 61.9

STC=(weight of wall)0.223x21.5

WALL WEIGHT (LB/SQ. FT.)

Ungrouted: 70 lb/sq. ft

Grouted 32″: 81 lb/sq. ft

Fully grouted: 114 lb/sq. ft

ENERGY RATING

R-value: 11.71 using 2″ expanded polystyrene insulation (see note below)

Calculation:

Outside Air =0.17
Brick =0.44
Air Gap =0.97
2 inch Polystyrene =8.00
8 inch CMU 105 pcf, grouted at 32″ o.c. =1.45
Interior Air =0.68
Total =11.71

R-value: 13.71 using 2″ extruded polystyrene insulation (see note below)

Calculation:

Outside Air =0.17
Brick =0.44
Air Gap =0.97
2 inch Polystyrene =10.00
8 inch CMU 105 pcf, grouted at 32″ o.c. =1.45
Interior Air =0.68
Total =13.71

Note: The type of rigid insulation you install affects the wall’s insulating capacity (the R-value). Polyisocyanurate insulation gives you 8.0 R per inch (12.0 R for 1.5″ or R16 for 2″). Expanded polystyrene insulation is worth 4.0 R per inch (6.0 R for 1.5″ or 8 R for 2″). Extruded polystyrene yields 5.0 R per inch (7.5 R for 1.5″ or 10 R for 2″). Use either thicker insulation or more expensive polyisocyanurate to achieve a higher energy rating.

GREEN/LEED RATING

DESIGN TIPS

  • Place rigid-board insulation in the drainage cavity to maximize interior usable space, and take advantage of the huge thermal mass provided by the masonry backup system.
  • Our sample design uses 2” insulation in the cavity, but many designers choose to use 1” insulation. The reason? If you use 1.5” insulation, coupled with a 1” air gap (required by Code), the entire wall can fit on a standard 14” wide foundation if you cantilever the brick a modest 1/8” over the edge of the foundation.
  • You can improve the R-value of this wall by substituting 3” foil-faced polyisocyanurate for 2” expanded polystyrene insulation in the cavity. This raises the R-Value of the wall from 11.7 to 21.5. It is important to note that this rigid insulation is continuous. It is penetrated only by thin 9-gauge wire ties to anchor the veneer.
  • Brick veneer expands as it ages, whereas concrete block shrinks. Don’t forget to detail expansion jointsin the brick veneer and control joints in the concrete block backup.
  • Shelf angles may not be required for veneer support at every floor line. Cut down on the number of shelf angles to save money and simplify your construction. If your veneer is shorter than 30 feet above the top of the foundation wall, you may not need relieving angles at all.

CONSTRUCTION TIPS

  • Back bevel mortar joints to prevent excess mortar from falling into the drainage cavity. The cavity needs to be open enough to permit water to drain down onto flashing below (ASHRAE 90.1).
  • Simplify construction by requesting to use the same mortar type on the veneer as the backup. Type N is usually fine for both, except in high seismic zones where Type S is required.

Roofing Contractor Oak Lawn

Introduction

You need a professional you can rely on when your roof needs repair or replacement. After all, your roof is the first line of defense when it comes to shielding your house from severe weather.

To take care of your home, you must employ qualified roofing contractors. A professional roofer might be more expensive than your preferred general contractor. It might cause you to change your mind and hire the less expensive choice so you can save money upfront. However, what about the long run?

Professional roofing contractors in Oak Lawn are knowledgeable and capable of performing the best, most complete job. So, this article covers all there is to know about roofing contractors, mainly in Chicago.

Why Hire a Roofing Contractor?

Although hiring a general contractor might seem practical, there are some jobs they are not equipped to handle. When your roof needs installation, repair, or replacement, the best option is a roofing contractor because of their certified credentials.

Following are the top four reasons why you should hire a roofing contractor:

1.    Knowledge & Expertise

Not that a general contractor couldn’t handle some repairs. A roofing contractor, however, has the knowledge and expertise required to know the best course of action for repairs. Some locations in Chicago, like Columbus, Ohio, demand that licensed roofers only perform work on roofs.

2.    Accurate Evaluation

They will identify your issue and offer the best solutions to resolve it. Detailed estimates of labor and material costs are also available from roofers.

3.    No Subcontractors

There are no subcontractors to manage when hiring roofers. Instead, you have access to skilled and knowledgeable workers at your disposal, and the outcomes are better when you collaborate. Subcontractors might not be knowledgeable about the circumstances, due to which the quality of the work may suffer. Commercial roofing contractors can help you save money in the long run by ensuring you get high-quality jobs done quickly.

4.    Knowledge of Building Codes

Local building codes are familiar to professional roofers. This knowledge is essential to prevent losing money on a renovation because of carelessness.

Do You Need Commercial Roofing or Residential Roofing?

When you are trying to find a ‘roofing contractor near me,’ first think about whether you need commercial or residential roofing. Residential roofing differs from commercial roofing in design, materials, repairs, and installation costs.

Ø Roof Design

The design is the primary difference between residential and commercial roofing.

Due to the more extensive square footage of commercial buildings compared to residential ones, the roof must be able to support the added weight and size. On the other hand, residential buildings have pitched roofs with a higher slope that is less complicated to install.

To avoid receiving incorrect or subpar work, your roofing contractors must have experience with the type of roofing you require.

Ø Materials Employed

Residential and commercial roofs must be constructed of sturdy materials, depending on their size, exposure to the elements, design, and other elements. It will ensure that the roof lasts as long as possible while making it flexible and simple to maintain. For instance, commercial roofs have a more extensive surface area and include air conditioning and ventilation features. This design must be supported and made to last longer by the materials used.

Roofs must be constructed from long-lasting materials, such as:

  • Ceramic, asphalt, tile, or slate shingles
  • Wood shakes
  • Metal roofing
  • Solar shingles
  • Other auxiliary materials

If you hire a roofing company, find out if they have experience with both commercial and residential roofs. Inquire about their warranty policy and the suppliers they use. It will allow you to check everything twice and guarantee a lifetime of high-quality roofing.

Ø Roof Maintenance

Commercial buildings have a larger surface area, making roof maintenance more difficult. For instance, you should always clear your gutters, especially in the fall and winter when debris can clog them.

With time and inclement weather, metal roofing or roof shingles may deteriorate. Checking in frequently to ensure everything is in order is a good idea.

Because they are smaller, residential roofs are simpler to maintain and more straightforward to inspect for damage. You can fix any damaged shingles by yourself and clear the gutters as necessary.

Ø Installation & Overall Cost

The installation process and overall cost are the two factors that most distinguish a commercial roof from a residential roof.

Get quotes from a reputable residential or commercial roofing company before you begin work to see if it fits your budget.

Due to the amount of labor and materials, size, and protective gear required for the installation, commercial roofing should cost more than residential roofing.

When Should You Hire a Roofing Contractor?

Keeping your roof in good working order requires routine maintenance. Here are some vital warning signs to watch out for if you’re unsure whether it’s time to get a roof repair or replacement.

ü Blown Off Shingles

A roof repair is necessary if you frequently discover asphalt shingles that have blown off your roof. Your roof is vulnerable to water damage if it lacks a layer of shingles.

ü Growth of Algae and Moss

If algae and moss are developing on your roof, it might be time for a replacement. Plant growth, which thrives in damp environments, may indicate that water is not properly draining off your roof.

ü Water Stains

Have you noticed any new stains on your walls or ceilings? Your roof may be allowing water to enter. It’s critical to have your roof inspected right away to prevent further structural harm,

ü Leaky roof

A leaking roof is an obvious indication that your roof needs repair.

ü High Energy Bills

Do you notice an increase in energy costs that you cannot explain? The problem might be with your roof. Your home’s insulation may be less effective with older roofs, which could make your heating and cooling systems work harder.

What to Seek When Hiring a Roofing Contractor?

You’re now prepared to work with a roofing contractor. However, you may be unsure what distinguishes a quality contractor from a poor one. Before hiring a contractor, you should ask them the following questions.

Do You Have a License & Insurance?

Although a general contractor license is technically not needed at the state level, many cities or counties do. To legally protect your home and themselves as well as their work, a high-quality roofing contractor will typically have both a license and insurance. Any trustworthy, adequately licensed general contractor will be willing to show you their credentials.

Do You Have Any Experience With My Kind Of Roof?

The knowledge and skill set required for various roofing materials vary. Employing a contractor who is knowledgeable about the type of roof you have is crucial. Check with your contractor to ensure they have the skills you require, regardless of whether you have a shingle roof or metal roof or are looking for assistance with commercial flat roofing.

Do You Provide Free Estimates Or Inspections?

Before starting work on your home, many contractors will provide you with free quotes or roof inspections. You’ll get a better idea of the cost and the amount of work required.

The Bottom Line

If you need roof replacement or repair services for a commercial or residential property in Chicago, hire a roofing contractor Chicago. They give you an accurate assessment of your roofing requirements and work with top-notch materials. Also, they have the best knowledge and expertise when it comes to roofing. Moreover, roofing in Chicago mainly asks for licensed roofing contractors in most areas.

In Chicago, Third Coast Exteriors is the top roofing contractor you can hire. With a group of qualified individuals, we provide the highest quality emergency roofing services in a short amount of time. Our group of professionals can handle your project quickly, correctly, and with care. In order to better support the building’s structural integrity, we also make sure to replace your roof with sturdy materials. Get in touch with us to receive our services for replacing roofs.

Roofing Contractor Hickory Hills

Introduction

You need a professional you can rely on when your roof needs repair or replacement. After all, your roof is the first line of defense when it comes to shielding your house from severe weather.

To take care of your home, you must employ qualified roofing contractors. A professional roofer might be more expensive than your preferred general contractor. It might cause you to change your mind and hire the less expensive choice so you can save money upfront. However, what about the long run?

Professional roofing contractors in Hickory Hills are knowledgeable and capable of performing the best, most complete job. So, this article covers all there is to know about roofing contractors, mainly in Chicago.

Why Hire a Roofing Contractor?

Although hiring a general contractor might seem practical, there are some jobs they are not equipped to handle. When your roof needs installation, repair, or replacement, the best option is a roofing contractor because of their certified credentials.

Following are the top four reasons why you should hire a roofing contractor:

1.    Knowledge & Expertise

Not that a general contractor couldn’t handle some repairs. A roofing contractor, however, has the knowledge and expertise required to know the best course of action for repairs. Some locations in Chicago, like Columbus, Ohio, demand that licensed roofers only perform work on roofs.

2.    Accurate Evaluation

They will identify your issue and offer the best solutions to resolve it. Detailed estimates of labor and material costs are also available from roofers.

3.    No Subcontractors

There are no subcontractors to manage when hiring roofers. Instead, you have access to skilled and knowledgeable workers at your disposal, and the outcomes are better when you collaborate. Subcontractors might not be knowledgeable about the circumstances, due to which the quality of the work may suffer. Commercial roofing contractors can help you save money in the long run by ensuring you get high-quality jobs done quickly.

4.    Knowledge of Building Codes

Local building codes are familiar to professional roofers. This knowledge is essential to prevent losing money on a renovation because of carelessness.

Do You Need Commercial Roofing or Residential Roofing?

When you are trying to find a ‘roofing contractor near me,’ first think about whether you need commercial or residential roofing. Residential roofing differs from commercial roofing in design, materials, repairs, and installation costs.

Ø Roof Design

The design is the primary difference between residential and commercial roofing.

Due to the more extensive square footage of commercial buildings compared to residential ones, the roof must be able to support the added weight and size. On the other hand, residential buildings have pitched roofs with a higher slope that is less complicated to install.

To avoid receiving incorrect or subpar work, your roofing contractors must have experience with the type of roofing you require.

Ø Materials Employed

Residential and commercial roofs must be constructed of sturdy materials, depending on their size, exposure to the elements, design, and other elements. It will ensure that the roof lasts as long as possible while making it flexible and simple to maintain. For instance, commercial roofs have a more extensive surface area and include air conditioning and ventilation features. This design must be supported and made to last longer by the materials used.

Roofs must be constructed from long-lasting materials, such as:

  • Ceramic, asphalt, tile, or slate shingles
  • Wood shakes
  • Metal roofing
  • Solar shingles
  • Other auxiliary materials

If you hire a roofing company, find out if they have experience with both commercial and residential roofs. Inquire about their warranty policy and the suppliers they use. It will allow you to check everything twice and guarantee a lifetime of high-quality roofing.

Ø Roof Maintenance

Commercial buildings have a larger surface area, making roof maintenance more difficult. For instance, you should always clear your gutters, especially in the fall and winter when debris can clog them.

With time and inclement weather, metal roofing or roof shingles may deteriorate. Checking in frequently to ensure everything is in order is a good idea.

Because they are smaller, residential roofs are simpler to maintain and more straightforward to inspect for damage. You can fix any damaged shingles by yourself and clear the gutters as necessary.

Ø Installation & Overall Cost

The installation process and overall cost are the two factors that most distinguish a commercial roof from a residential roof.

Get quotes from a reputable residential or commercial roofing company before you begin work to see if it fits your budget.

Due to the amount of labor and materials, size, and protective gear required for the installation, commercial roofing should cost more than residential roofing.

When Should You Hire a Roofing Contractor?

Keeping your roof in good working order requires routine maintenance. Here are some vital warning signs to watch out for if you’re unsure whether it’s time to get a roof repair or replacement.

ü Blown Off Shingles

A roof repair is necessary if you frequently discover asphalt shingles that have blown off your roof. Your roof is vulnerable to water damage if it lacks a layer of shingles.

ü Growth of Algae and Moss

If algae and moss are developing on your roof, it might be time for a replacement. Plant growth, which thrives in damp environments, may indicate that water is not properly draining off your roof.

ü Water Stains

Have you noticed any new stains on your walls or ceilings? Your roof may be allowing water to enter. It’s critical to have your roof inspected right away to prevent further structural harm,

ü Leaky roof

A leaking roof is an obvious indication that your roof needs repair.

ü High Energy Bills

Do you notice an increase in energy costs that you cannot explain? The problem might be with your roof. Your home’s insulation may be less effective with older roofs, which could make your heating and cooling systems work harder.

What to Seek When Hiring a Roofing Contractor?

You’re now prepared to work with a roofing contractor. However, you may be unsure what distinguishes a quality contractor from a poor one. Before hiring a contractor, you should ask them the following questions.

Do You Have a License & Insurance?

Although a general contractor license is technically not needed at the state level, many cities or counties do. To legally protect your home and themselves as well as their work, a high-quality roofing contractor will typically have both a license and insurance. Any trustworthy, adequately licensed general contractor will be willing to show you their credentials.

Do You Have Any Experience With My Kind Of Roof?

The knowledge and skill set required for various roofing materials vary. Employing a contractor who is knowledgeable about the type of roof you have is crucial. Check with your contractor to ensure they have the skills you require, regardless of whether you have a shingle roof or metal roof or are looking for assistance with commercial flat roofing.

Do You Provide Free Estimates Or Inspections?

Before starting work on your home, many contractors will provide you with free quotes or roof inspections. You’ll get a better idea of the cost and the amount of work required.

The Bottom Line

If you need roof replacement or repair services for a commercial or residential property in Chicago, hire a roofing contractor Chicago. They give you an accurate assessment of your roofing requirements and work with top-notch materials. Also, they have the best knowledge and expertise when it comes to roofing. Moreover, roofing in Chicago mainly asks for licensed roofing contractors in most areas.

In Chicago, Third Coast Exteriors is the top roofing contractor you can hire. With a group of qualified individuals, we provide the highest quality emergency roofing services in a short amount of time. Our group of professionals can handle your project quickly, correctly, and with care. In order to better support the building’s structural integrity, we also make sure to replace your roof with sturdy materials. Get in touch with us to receive our services for replacing roofs.

Stages of Asphalt Shingle Deterioration

Introduction

The lifespan of asphalt shingles depends on the type you choose, the manufacturer, and where you live. Some shingles last longer than others; for example, those made with a higher percentage of granules tend to last longer than those made with fewer granules. The first thing to do when trying to determine whether your roof has reached its end-of-life is take a look at it yourself or hire someone who knows how to inspect roofs professionally. If you’re not sure what signs of wear and tear mean that it’s time for replacement—or if your roofer isn’t telling you—then read on!

Aging

As asphalt shingles age, the effects of weather can become more pronounced. The shingles will become discolored and may develop cracks or ripples. The granules that comprise your roof’s surface may also begin to separate from the asphalt backing as they come apart over time.

The lifespan of a typical residential asphalt shingle is about 20 years, but this is dependent on many factors: where you live, how heavily it rains in your area and what kind of environment you have around your house (e.g., trees, other buildings). Shingles typically deteriorate faster in areas with heavy rainfall due to their exposure to moisture and sunlight—especially if they’re not covered by other structures like roofs or eaves.

Loss of mineral granules

Asphalt shingles are covered with a layer of mineral granules that give them their color. These tiny rocks are made of natural resources like quartz or feldspar, and can be washed away by rainwater or sun rays. When this happens, the shingles lose their appearance and color, leaving only the asphalt underneath.

Cracking and cupping

When asphalt shingles crack and cup, it’s an indication of their age. Cracking is normal, but if the cracks are too large or have spidered out to cover a large portion of the roof, it needs to be fixed before water can get in. Cupping is caused by uneven exposure to weather, which can result in problems like mold growth or algae growth.

Some roofers believe that cracking and cupping are not an immediate threat to your roof; others believe that they are causes for concern because they allow moisture into the attic space where it could damage other components of your home (such as insulation).

Blistering and splitting

Asphalt shingles are prone to splitting and blistering, both caused by different factors. Blistering occurs when water gets trapped under the shingle during installation or precipitation events. Splitting is caused by temperature changes that cause the asphalt in your roof to expand and contract, which causes it to crack.

The best way to prevent these issues is by making sure you apply enough granular material at the time of installation and by choosing a high-quality brand of asphalt shingle that has been properly designed for your climate zone. If you’ve already discovered this problem on one section of your roof, then calling a professional contractor can help fix it before it spreads across other areas as well

Curling and buckling

Buckling shingles can occur when the shingle is exposed to heat. This can be caused by improper ventilation, improper installation or poor quality asphalt.

Incorrect ventilation causes buckling by locking moisture in between the shingles and preventing it from drying out properly. If your roof does not have proper ventilation, this may cause buckling to occur sooner than expected.

Algae growth

Algae growth is also a common problem, especially in coastal areas. While algae can be removed by scrubbing the shingles with a stiff brush and bleach, preventing algae growth will save you time and money in the long run. One way to prevent algae from growing is by keeping your roof clean. You should clean your roof every three months with a pressure washer.

Older shingles are more susceptible to damage than newer ones.

The age of your roof is a factor in whether or not you will experience damage. Shingles are made from asphalt and mineral granules, which are bound together by resins. Asphalt gets brittle with age, while the minerals break down. This aging process is accelerated in high heat and humidity, so if your house has been sitting in the sun for years on end, it’s likely that its shingles need to be replaced before they become dangerous to walk on.

Conclusion

Asphalt shingles are a popular choice for residential roofs, and they can last a long time if they’re properly installed and maintained. But as weather conditions change, so do the needs of your roof. If you have older asphalt shingles that need replacing or repairing, don’t hesitate to call us at 773-251-9422 for an estimate.

Quincy Sizemore

Third Coast Exteriors

Owner